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Cybersquatting Scams

10 Ways to Protect Your Twitter Account From Getting Hacked

…p your Twitter or email username and password, usually so they can send out spam to all your followers from your account. Often, they’ll try to trick you with a link that goes to a fake login page. Beware of typosquatting or cybersquatting. Typosquatting, which is also known as URL hijacking, is a form of cybersquatting that targets internet users who accidentally type a website address into their web browser incorrectly. When users make a…

What is Typosquatting?

Typosquatting, also known as URL hijacking, is a form of cybersquatting (sitting on sites under someone else’s brand or copyright) that targets Internet users who incorrectly type a website address into their web browser (e.g., “Gooogle.com” instead of “Google.com”). When users make such a typographical error, they may be led to an alternative website owned by a hacker that is usually designed for malicious purposes. Hackers often create fake…

10 Secure Online Holiday Shopping Tips

…er via an e-mail automatically be suspicious. The same goes with offers via tweets and messages received in any social media site. Don’t click the links in e-mails. Especially if it’s a “too good to be true” offer. Beware of cybersquatting and typosquatting which may look like the domain of a legitimate eTailer. Look for https:// in the address bar signifying it’s a secure page. Generally, scammers won’t take the time to set up secure sites….

5 Tips To Secure Online Shopping This President’s Day

…never you receive an unsolicited email offer, you ought to automatically be suspicious. Delete. # 3. SCAM: Domain squatting: When what looks like a trusted website sends you an email looking like a familiar domain, beware of cybersquatting and typosquatting, in which the address only resembles the legitimate domain, but is a trap. SOLUTION: Make sure you’ve been taken to the correct URL for the retailer. #4 SCAM: Unsecured sites. Scammers…

10 Tips to Secure Online Shopping

…same goes for offers via tweets and in social media. Don’t click the links in emails. Always go to the source. Use your favorites menu or manually type in the address in your web browser with a safe search plug-in. Beware of cybersquatting and typosquatting which may look like the domain of the legitimate eTailer. Use secure sites. https in the address bar signifies it’s a secure page. Beware of eBay scammers. Don’t respond to eBay email offers….

10 Security Tips For Holiday Shopping

…ng a link, especially if the offer sounds too good to be true. 3. If a familiar and trusted website sends you an email offer and you decide to click, make sure you’ve been taken to the correct URL for the retailer. Beware of cybersquatting and typosquatting, in which the address only resembles the legitimate domain. 4. When placing an order online, always look for “https://” in the address bar, signifying that a page is secure. Scammers…

Typosquatting Scams in Social Media

Typosquatting, or URL hijacking, is a form of cybersquatting that targets Internet users who accidentally type a website address into their web browser incorrectly. When users make a typographical error while entering the website address, they may be led to an alternative website owned by a cybersquatter or criminal hacker. In a new twist, some typosquatters have begun using these domains to advertise deceptive promotions, offering gift cards…

11 Tips to Secure Online Shopping

…ffer via an e-mail automatically be suspicious. The same goes with offers via tweets and messages received in any social media site. Don’t click the links in e-mails. Especially if it’s a too good to be true offer. Beware of cybersquatting and typosquatting which may look like the domain of the legitimate eTailer. Look for https:// in the address bar signifying it’s a secure page. Generally, scammers won’t take the time to set up secure sites….

5 Tips to a Secure Cyber Monday

…, generally under $50. It’s safer to make larger purchases from eTailers that also have brick and mortar locations. Typosquatters: Be sure you’ve typed in the correct address and are at the eTailer’s actual domain. Beware of cybersquatting and typosquatting, which rely on imitation websites that resemble your desired destination, but are in fact copies, using domains that are similar to the legitimate web address. Unsecured sites: When placing…

Cybersquatting Scams Aren’t Over Yet

…ng can wreak on a brand’s reputation. Sometimes, criminals copy a brand’s entire website in order to collect usernames and passwords from unwitting visitors. The hackers then test those names and passwords on other websites. Cybersquatting increased by 18% last year, with a documented 440,584 cybersquatting sites in the fourth quarter alone, according to MarkMonitor’s annual Brandjacking Index report. I’ve written before about the time I was…

Typosquatting for Fun and Profit

Typosquatting, which is also known as URL hijacking, is a form of cybersquatting that targets Internet users who accidentally type a website address into their web browser incorrectly. When users make a typographical error while entering the website address, they may be led to an alternative website owned by a cybersquatter or criminal hacker. Typosquatters often create spoofed sites that may have the look and feel of the intended site….

Seven Social Media Landmines to Watch Out For

In the early days of the web, cybersquatting was a concern among corporations who were late to the game in getting their domain names. I had a little battle with LedZeppelin.com that I regret, but that’s another story. Today that same battle is being played out in social media. Anyone can register any brand or likeness on social media with very little difficulty, and it’s free. Once the scammer owns your name, they can pose as you, blog as you,…

Cybersquatting Scams

10 Tips to Secure Online Holiday Shopping

…king the links, especially if it’s a too good to be true offer. If it’s a known site sending the email and you decide to click links, make sure the address you end up at is in fact the actual domain of the eTailer. Beware of cybersquatting and typosquatting which may look like the domain of the legitimate eTailer. When placing an order always look for HttpS is the address bar signifying it’s a secure page. Scammer generally won’t take the time…

10 Ways to Prevent Social Media Scams

…ntially every month, and old and new users are still being victimized. James Carnall, manager of the cyberintelligence division at security monitoring firm Cyveillance, says, “Social media cybersquatting is where domain name cybersquatting was ten years ago”. Scammers aren’t just stealing identities and spreading malware. They are brand jacking in ways that are hurting companies’ bottom lines. While many may not have sympathy for the…

12 Awful Reasons Why Impostors Commit Social Media Identity Theft

…past few years. Unfortunately, this list is going to keep growing. Varieties of fraud that can occur via social media are only up to the imagination of the thief. Submit your own findings. Let’s hear what other whacked out social media identity thieves are doing. To prevent social media identity theft, register all your officers, company names and branded products on every social media site you can find to prevent Twitter squatting and…

8 Ways to Prevent Business Social Media Identity Theft

…s generally leave the networks wide open for attack. Prevent social media identity theft: Register all your officers, company names and branded products on every social media site you can find to prevent twittersquatting and cybersquatting. You can do this manually or by using a very cost effective service called Knowem.com. Invest in Intelius identity theft protection and prevention. Not all forms of identity theft protection can be prevented,…

Cybersquatting Leads to Identity Theft

…brand’s reputation. Sometimes, criminals copy a brand’s entire website in order to collect usernames and passwords from unwitting visitors. Then, the hackers will test those names and passwords on other websites. Cybersquatting increased by 18% last year, with a documented 440,584 cybersquatting sites in the fourth quarter alone, according to MarkMonitor’s annual Brandjacking Index report. Intellectual property owners can sue…

Sarah Palin Victim of Social Media Identity Theft, LaRussa Drops Suit

…Twitter should rethink its policies. Meanwhile, USA Today reports that St. Louis Cardinals manager Tony LaRussa, who has also fallen victim to social media identity theft and has sued Twitter, claiming damage resulting from “cybersquatting” and misappropriation of his name, has now dropped his lawsuit. One report mentions an out of court settlement that compensates LaRussa for his legal fees and includes a donation to his favorite charity….

Typosquatting on Twitter and other social networks

Robert Siciliano Identity Theft Expert Typosquatting, which is also known as URL hijacking, is a form of cybersquatting that targets Internet users who accidentally type a website address into their web browser incorrectly. When users make a typographical error while entering the website address, they may be led to an alternative website owned by a cybersquatter. This can lead to financial or social media identity theft. Phishing is the…

How to prevent social media identity theft

…u can’t. However, there are several things you can and should do in order to manage your social media identity, which may prevent social media identity theft. What exactly is social media identity theft? It’s a form of cybersquatting using social media sites. If you’ve ever attempted to join a social media, more commonly known as a social networking site, or applied for an email account, and found that your first and last name were already…

Identity Theft Expert; Cybersquatting Leads to Fraud

…they should own the domain. When served, I freaked and called them yelling to take it, I never wanted that. One of few regrets. But I have a nice 1 inch thick book about me and the band and why I’m an idiot. Anyways back to cybersquatting. A recent report from the NY Times sourced MarkMonitor, a domain name seller and company that protects brands names from misuse, tracked an 18 percent rise in incidence of cybersquatting. Which means as a…

 

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