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5 Hiring Tips on How to Spot Resume Fraud

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Most of us have read the resume of a friend or family member and did a double take and asked “Is this really you?”

Resumes are designed to express to a potential employer your work history and skill sets. They are designed as a guide for an employer to use as a checklist to evaluate your potential. A well written resume with the right content coupled with a good interview is an interviewees best shot at getting a job.

The problem with resumes is they are created based on the honor system. Resume fraud is on the rise and honesty is in short supply these days. And while a potential employer can certainly conduct due-diligence with a series of reference checks, the information on a resume is often exaggerated and candy coated.

As a small business you can use these hiring tips to see through the smoke and mirrors and get to the point.

#1 Confirm education degrees. Any claims to any qualifications must be vetted by contacting the issuing institution to verify legitimacy and current status. If they say they attended a college be sure it wasn’t just a Springtime Kegger.

#2 Confirm all professional licenses. Most states of licensing boards online that allow for quick checks on the current status of professional licensing. Many national trade associations provide similar services. But make sure the National Association of Supreme Mechanics or whatever is recognized by another familiar organization.

#3 Confirm employment history. It’s not enough to know they worked there. You want to know that in-fact they did and why they aren’t.

#4 Inquire about resume gaps. Extensive gaps in employment might be a sign they left a job on bad terms and didn’t notate it on a resume. Background checks may show those previous non-listed jobs.

#5 Google them. Look on LinkedIn, Facebook and elsewhere. An exhaustive search of their given name, nicknames and social media handles/monikers might bring up damaging information that will help you make an effective decision.

Robert Siciliano personal and small business security specialist toADT Small Business Security discussingADT Pulse on Fox News. Disclosures

About the Author
ROBERT SICILIANO, CEO of IDTheftSecurity.com is fiercely committed to informing, educating, and empowering Americans so they can be protected from violence and crime in the physical and virtual worlds. His "tell it like it is" style is sought after by major media outlets, executives in the C-Suite of leading corporations, meeting planners, and community leaders to get the straight talk they need to stay safe in a world in which physical and virtual crime is commonplace. Siciliano is accessible, real, professional, and ready to weigh in and comment at a moment's notice on breaking news.

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